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Quartz vs. Marble: Which Works Better for You?

by Jeremy Troetti

Updated on October 21, 2019 04:29:29 PM


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Quartz and marble are two of the most frequently used materials for countertops. Having quartz countertops or marble countertops in your home will add instant appeal.  

 

When you decide on the type of stone that is suitable for your home, there are several factors that you must consider. This guide will help you figure out whether quartz or marble will be a better fit for your home remodeling project. 

 

Comparisons of Quartz and Marble 

 

How is Quartz engineered? 

 

The primary difference between quartz and other types of stone countertops is that quartz countertops are made of manufactured stone. Quartz countertops are created by combining roughly 90 percent of the quartz mineral with about 10 percent resins, polymers and pigments. These percentages can slightly differ depending on the individual countertop. 

 

Variations of Quartz 

 

There are many different variations of quartz countertops. Because the stone is engineered, quartz can be modified to have the look of natural stone you may want. Marble.com offers 85 different colors of quartz countertops to choose from.  

  

How is Marble Formed? 

 

Marble forms as a result of limestone that is subject to extreme heat and pressure. The combination of heat and pressure recrystallizes the calcite in limestone and modifies the texture. Additional minerals create the color and veining that is seen in various types of marble. 

 

Variations of Marble 

 

There are many variations of marble that you can choose for your kitchen countertop, bathrooms, floors or any other home remodeling project. Common types of marble include Carrara, Calacatta, Emperador and Crema Marfil. If you are looking for any type of marble countertops, from Calacatta Borghini to Rainforest Green, Marble.com has an extensive collection. 

 

Appearance of Quartz and Marble 

 

Quartz has risen in popularity in recent years because of its high-quality looks. The countertops can be modified to look just like natural stone countertops.  

 

In terms of appearance, marble has a classy and timeless look. The natural stone’s elegant veining will impress anyone who sees it.

 

In a comparison of appearance, marble will be the better choice. Although quartz can imitate the look, there is nothing quite like the actual natural stone.

 

Cost of Quartz and Marble 

 

If you are looking to buy a quartz countertop, you should prepare to pay in the range of $70 to $175 per square foot installed. Additional factors like customization can push prices to the higher end of the range. 

 

Marble typically costs around $50 to $150 per square foot installed. The price also depends on other factors, including the type of marble you buy. Rarer forms of marble will cost more. 

 

If you are looking for a better idea of the cost of either quartz or marble, you should get an estimate. If you are looking for the more affordable option, marble will be a better choice for you.

 

Maintenance of Quartz and Marble 

 

Because quartz is engineered, it is non-porous. This can be very helpful when used in high traffic areas, such as in the kitchen. A key difference in terms of maintenance between quartz and marble is that your quartz countertop will not need to be sealed. To clean the surface, all you will need is soap and water.  

 

While maintenance of a quartz countertop sounds relatively easy, there is one significant drawback that you should know: Quartz countertops are not heat resistant. If you place hot pots or pans on the surface, the resin will burn, and you will be left with a permanent mark on your countertop. 

 

Because marble is porous, the material can be damaged by spilling any acidic products, such as juice or coffee, on the surface. If you have a marble countertop, you must be careful and avoid spills like these. Do not use any vinegar or bleach products to clean the countertop. You should also not use Windex, as these cleaners can damage marble. To clean your marble, use cleaners that are specifically designed for use with the material. 

 

Your quartz or marble countertops can last for years if you take care of them properly. In terms of maintenance requirements, quartz is the better option for homeowners who are looking for a surface that requires minimal maintenance.

 

Installation of Quartz and Marble 

 

You will need to hire a professional to install your quartz countertops. It is not recommended that any homeowner, even those that are highly skilled, attempt to install their quartz countertop. Hiring a professional will significantly lower the chance of any damages occurring during the installation process. 

 

As with quartz, to install your marble countertops you will also need a professional for the job. It is not advised that you attempt to install your marble countertops on your own. Using a professional significantly decreases the chance of any damages happening when your marble countertop is installed.

 

There is no clear advantage when it comes to installation. You will need a professional to install either material. 

 

Durability of Quartz and Marble 

 

Quartz is an almost indestructible countertop surface. Despite this, you should still always be cautious to avoid any rare chance that damage may occur. As mentioned above, do not place excessive heat on the surface of a quartz countertop. If you do, your countertop will be irreversibly damaged. 

 

As explained above, marble is extremely vulnerable to spills. Marble is also prone to scratching if you are not careful on the countertop. However, if you take good care of the stone, marble will provide your kitchen or bathroom countertop with a stunning look for years to come.

 

Quartz is your better bet when it comes to durability. 

 

Moisture Resistance of Quartz and Marble 

 

Quartz is non-porous, which makes the surface moisture resistant. However, while it is moisture resistant, you should still should not leave any spills that may occur sitting on the countertop. 

 

If properly sealed, a marble countertop will be moisture resistant. Keep in mind that the surface must be properly sealed, which is a process that you will need to have done a few times per year. Marble is highly susceptible to acidic substances, including coffee, wine, juice, soda and vinegar. 

 

Quartz is the more moisture-resistant surface of the two.

  

Heat Resistance of Quartz and Marble 

 

Although quartz is nearly indestructible, you should exercise extreme caution with heat around your quartz countertop. The material is not heat resistant, and the resin will melt if it encounters extreme heat. Always use trivets or hot pads so no damage from hot kitchen items occurs. 

 

A marble countertop can handle some heat, but you should not place hot pots or pans directly on the surface. When handling items such as those, you should use trivets or hot pads to avoid any potential damages to the countertop.

 

Considering that quartz is not heat resistant, marble is your better option for a heat resistant countertop. That said, you should not expose marble to excessive heat on a consistent basis. 

 

Repair of Quartz and Marble 

 

Quartz rarely gets damaged, so it is unlikely that you will need to do any repairs. This is not to say that a quartz countertop can never sustain damages. If you do have any minor damages to your quartz countertop, they can be easily repaired. 

 

You can purchase marble repair kits to fix any chips in the stone. You do not necessarily need a professional to fix the chips. However, larger damages will require the help of a professional. Make note that marble needs to be re-sealed as often as every three months.

 

Both options can easily be repaired. Because of this, there is no clear better option here.

 

Resale Value of Quartz and Marble 

 

Quartz is attractive to prospective buyers because of its easy maintenance. Having a quartz countertop can be a major selling point when trying to win over a potential buyer. 

 

Having marble in your home will provide great value. The material will present an elegant and distinguished look that will catch the eye of potential buyers. But this value is only sustainable if you take good care of the marble. Taking proper care of the stone can be done by following the recommendations above. Damaged or worn marble will lose a significant amount of its value.

 

If properly cared for, marble holds immense appeal. In general, natural stone will always have a higher resale value than engineered stone. 

 

Where Should I Have Quartz? 

 

There are endless amounts of places in the house where you can have quartz. Quartz may hold the greatest functional value when used in your kitchen, as the inevitable spills on the countertop can be cleaned easily. Additionally, quartz is a very sanitary surface, which also makes it a good choice in the kitchen. 

 

Where Should I Have Marble? 

 

Marble can work well in many different places in the house. It is often used for both kitchen and bathroom countertops. Between the kitchen and bathroom, marble may be better for your bathroom countertop, as it will typically not be prone to spills from acidic substances like it would be in the kitchen. If you decide to install a marble countertop in your bathroom, just be mindful that it is properly sealed, because it will be subject to a high amount of moisture. You can also have a marble table if you are not using it to prepare food or to eat and drink on.  

 

 

Installing quartz or marble in your home offers many benefits, from aesthetically pleasing looks to added value. Whether you end up choosing quartz or marble, this guide will provide you with the knowledge you need before making any decision to purchase.



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Originally posted on June 27, 2019 10:13:59 AM

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